The Göttingen Campus

The Göttingen location has come to be synonymous with high-quality international research. To ensure that this remains the case in the future, the University of Göttingen, including the University Medical Center, and eight non-university local research centres have joined forces to form the Göttingen Campus.

By drawing on their joint strengths and potential, campus partners have created a unique and stimulating environment that encourages diversity and an active exchange between professors, researchers and doctoral students.

Across the Göttingen Campus, there are currently more than 5,900 researchers working in nearly every scientific discipline.

Within the Göttingen Campus, the quality of teaching and training of early career scientists is assured and continuously improved by joint graduate programmes and inter-institute junior research groups.

Science on campus benefits from excellent joint third-party funded projects and 23 joint professorships between the University and non-university institutions.

Latest news

  • She pampers him, he takes care of the offspring and drives away attackers
    In mammals, pair bonds are very rare, one of the few exceptions being the red titi monkeys of South America. These relatively small tree dwellers live in pairs or small family groups and are characterized by the fact that the males take intensive care of their offspring. A team of researchers from the German Primate Center - Leibniz Institute for Primate Research has now investigated how pair relationships work in titi monkeys. Their results…
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  • Three years ago, Göttingen Nobel Laureate Stefan Hell and his team introduced MINFLUX nanoscopy. With this technique it was possible for the first time to separate fluorescing molecules with light that were only a few nanometers apart - this is as sharp as it can get. Now, the Max Planck researchers present the technique's latest development: MINFLUX now reaches this resolution in cells, with multicolor imaging and in 3D. Thus, MINFLUX nanoscopy can now be boradly applied in biological research. (in German)
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  • A single star has provided information about the collision of the Milky Way with the dwarf galaxy Gaia-Enceladus. The event likely took place approximately 11.5 billion years ago.
    The dwarf galaxy Gaia-Enceladus collided with the Milky Way probably approximately 11.5 billion years ago. A team of researchers including scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research (MPS) in Germany for the first time used a single star affected by the collision as a clue for dating. Using observational data from ground-based observatories and space telescopes, the scientists led by the University of Birmingham were able…
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  • Team of scientists from Halle-Wittenberg and Göttingen identifies responsible gene
    Scientists at the Universities of Halle-Wittenberg and Göttingen have succeeded in proving that a claw disease in cows is primarily genetic. Until now, the occurrence of interdigital hyperplasia has mostly been attributed to poor hygiene conditions in the barn. However, the team discovered a farm in which the disease occurred frequently and was able to identify the gene responsible. As a result, the disease may now be contained through selective…
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  • Team from Göttingen, Helsinki and New York gets new insights into the evolution of myxomycetes
    Most people associate the idea of creatures trapped in amber with insects or spiders, which are preserved lifelike in fossil tree resin. An international research team of palaeontologists and biologists from the Universities of Göttingen and Helsinki, and the American Museum of Natural History in New York has now discovered the oldest slime mould identified to date. The fossil is about 100 million years old and is exquisitely preserved in amber…
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